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Foundation Documents and Learning Outcomes

Advanced Written and Oral Communication
American Heritage
First-Year Writing
Civilization
Quantitative Reasoning
Languages of Learning
Letters
Global and Cultural Awareness
Scientific Principles and Reasoning
Arts
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Advanced Written and Oral Communication

  1. Students will demonstrate rhetorical knowledge by writing clearly; focusing on a well-defined purpose; using conventions of format and structure fitting the discourse community; arguing appropriately; and adopting a voice, tone, and level of formality suited to specialized academic, professional, or public audiences. Students will produce, among other assignments, a substantive single-authored research paper, and they will show rhetorical flexibility by writing at least once for a general audience.
  2. Students will use appropriate research tools and processes, including library research. Students will identify and evaluate sources, retrieve and evaluate data, take notes, and follow conventions of quoting, paraphrasing, and summarizing. They will cite sources properly and demonstrate an understanding of ethical issues related to research, including how to avoid plagiarism.
  3. Students will prewrite, draft, revise, edit, and proofread. The course should support these skills with instruction in some of the following processes: collecting data, finding and synthesizing evidence, and creating sound arguments; organizing the material for a paper; writing successive drafts of the same paper; writing collaboratively; peer reviewing; revising; improving style; editing grammar, usage, and punctuation; and using conventional formats. These processes will reflect practice of inquiry within the appropriate discourse community.
  4. Students will effectively give a formal oral presentation that requires public speaking skills, presentation media, and a prepared message. Students will focus on a topic, adapt it to the understanding of a particular audience, organize the main points coherently and support them with adequate detail, and deliver a message effectively using appropriate visuals. The delivery could occur in a poster conference, an in-class presentation, as part of an undergraduate research conference or professional conference, or as part of a public presentation.
  5. Students will understand the genres, forms, styles, and documentation conventions of writing for their discourse community. They will also gain skills in editing, syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling.

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American Heritage

  1. Explain the historical context within which American independence was declared and won.
  2. Compare and contrast the Founders’ constitutionalism with more recent concerns of democracy and rights.
  3. Identify and discuss the essential features of the United States Constitution as they relate to human freedom and the structures which protect that freedom.
  4. Understand the role of competitive economic institutions as an auxiliary to state action.
  5. Explain distinctively Latter-day Saint perspectives on the Constitution, including the political and social climate at the time of the restoration.
  6. Recognize challenges to the early tradition of American constitutionalism and substantive changes in the interpretation and functioning of the Constitution and our political and economic institutions.
  7. Recognize the privileges and responsibilities associated with citizenship in the USA.

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First-Year Writing

  1. Demonstrate that they can focus on a well-defined purpose in writing, write clearly for a specified audience, use conventions of format and structure appropriate to the rhetorical situation, and adopt a voice, tone, and level of formality suited to the purpose and audience. They may also learn about and practice the following: responding to the needs of different audiences; responding appropriately to different kinds of rhetorical situations; writing in several genres; and exploring the ways different genres shape writing and reading.
  2. Develop productive and flexible individual and collaborative writing processes, including prewriting, drafting, revising, editing and proofreading. These processes could include the following: collecting data, finding supporting evidence, and creating good arguments; organizing the material for a paper; writing successive drafts of the same paper; group writing; seeking and using peer responses; revising; editing grammar, usage, and punctuation; and using conventional formats.
  3. Read and evaluate written materials from a variety of genres. They should demonstrate their ability to read critically, which would include some of the following: analyzing and evaluating arguments; identifying authors’ claims and main ideas; identifying supporting evidence; identifying premises and unstated assumptions; evaluating logic and logical fallacies; drawing inferences; synthesizing ideas; identifying and evaluating analogies and figurative language; and distinguishing among emotional, ethical, and rational appeals.
  4. Demonstrate that they can locate and evaluate print and electronic sources and use these sources to write a documented research paper.
  5. Demonstrate their knowledge of the following: common formats for different kinds of texts; genre conventions ranging from purpose and structure to tone and mechanics; methods of documenting borrowed information; and conventions of edited syntax, grammar, punctuation, and spelling.

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Civilization

  1. Demonstrate a broad general understanding of the sweep of human history and the roles of individuals, peoples, and cultures in establishing civilization as we know it
  2. Show a precise knowledge of human events, ideas, and accomplishments generally recognized to be formative and fundamental to the history of civilization
  3. Appreciate representative cultural works that have helped establish idealized relationships of humankind to the divine, to one another, and to nature—and that have attempted to define and explain beauty as necessary to the well-being of the individual soul as well as of the larger society
  4. Evince preparation for lifelong engagement with and appreciation of world history—and of philosophy, literature, science, or the arts

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Quantitative Reasoning

  1. Improve critical thinking and problem solving, especially as these apply to quantitative analysis.
  2. Prepare to identify and intelligently face problems they encounter later in life that require quantitative reasoning.

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Languages of Learning

MATHEMATICS OPTION

1. Demonstrate proficiency in beginning calculus or a similarly advanced quantitative discipline.

2. Demonstrate the ability to use numerical tools to explain the world in quantitative terms, interpret numerical data, and evaluate arguments that rely on quantitative information and approaches (Aims).

WORLD LANGUAGES OPTION

For European languages:

1. Demonstrate intermediate proficiency in the target language as defined by the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL) proficiency guidelines for reading, writing, speaking, and listening (where applicable).

2. Recognize and analyze a selection of literary works in the target language within their historical and cultural context.

For non-European languages:

1. Demonstrate novice-high or intermediate level proficiency in the target language as defined by ACTFL proficiency guidelines for speaking and listening (where applicable).

2. Read and analyze important cultural or literary contributions in the target language or in translation.

3. Gain basic familiarity with the target language’s written symbols.

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Letters

  1. Demonstrate skills in critical reading as they analyze primary historical, philosophical, theological, or literary texts as artifacts worthy of study in themselves,
  2. Demonstrate they can interpret and appreciate texts in their contexts, understanding a writer’s cultural background, purpose, audience, and rhetorical strategies (like argument or figurative language),
  3. Show they can evaluate texts for their power to shape culture and their spiritual insight.

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Global and Cultural Awareness

  1. Acquire informed awareness of a) a culture other than the student’s primary (or most familiar) culture, or b) the interplay of multiple cultures, languages, and/or nations.
  2. Engage in thoughtful reflection of that informed awareness in a structured, guided manner under the direction of a faculty member, as evidenced by student written or spoken analyses (often involving comparison) in consideration of a culture, multicultural interplay, or global issue.
  3. Develop greater empathy and charity as they gain a broader perspective and learn to see themselves from another’s point of view.

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Scientific Principles and Reasoning

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the basic scientific principles which undergird the scientific process, including the strengths and weaknesses of this process.
  2. Appreciate the excitement of discovery that has accompanied important scientific developments.
  3. Demonstrate how scientific methodology can be used to analyze real-world science-related problems.
  4. Evaluate scientific data and claims in order to make rational decisions on public-policy science issues that affect their community.
  5. Express their thoughts (in oral, graphical, and written formats) on scientific topics clearly, including appropriate use of basic scientific vocabulary and effective interpretation of quantitative data.
  6. Reflect rationally upon the interface between science and religion.

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Arts

  1. Demonstrate an understanding of the elements, forms, aesthetic and compositional principles of at least one form of artistic expression (e.g., visual arts, creative writing, dance, film, music, or theatre).
  2. Become acquainted with a variety of representative works in at least one art form.
  3. Demonstrate analytical literacy in at least one art form, meaning the ability to invoke the vocabulary, grammar, and theoretical models of the art form for the purpose of “reading” a work of art.
  4. Develop the ability to recognize multiple possible interpretations of an art work, and identify the work’s adherence to or departure from the genre’s traditions and conventions.
  5. For theory-based Arts courses: demonstrate the ability to engage in critical analysis of works of art, including an understanding of the historical and cultural factors that should inform an appreciation of such works.
  6. For applied Arts courses: develop increased creative imagination and independent thought by directly engaging with the art form as a performer or maker.

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