GE & BYU Mission Alignment Table


General Education Learning Outcomes were developed during Fall 2010 semester and are included in the BYU Learning Outcomes web page. Click here to obtain a pdf version of the table below that shows how the outcomes align with the "BYU Mission Statement" and The Aims of a BYU Education.

BYU MISSION STATEMENTTHE AIMS OF A BYU EDUCATIONLEARNING OUTCOMES*
As students progress through the General Education Program at Brigham Young University they will be able to:
1. Knowledge
''Because the gospel encourages the pursuit of truth, students at BYU should receive a broad university education. The arts, letters and sciences provide the core of such an education.''

“BYU undergraduate students should be educated in the following broad areas of human knowledge:

Historical perspectives – development of human civilization, appreciation for the unique contributions of America to modern civilization, and a general historical perspective

Science – the basic concepts of the physical, biological, and social sciences

Arts and Letters – lively appreciation of the artistic, literary, and intellectual achievements of human cultures

Global awareness – informed awareness of the peoples, cultures, languages, and nations of the world.”

1. Demonstrate foundational knowledge and skills in the methods of investigating, expressing, and evaluating concepts in the following disciplines:

Arts
History
Humanities and Languages
Natural Sciences and Mathematics
Social Sciences

Details of the core concepts are listed in the foundation documents for the various general education requirements.

2. Communication

“*Students will+ think clearly, *and+ communicate effectively.”

“Effective communication—language abilities that enable students to listen, speak, read, and write well; to communicate effectively with a wide range of audiences in one’s area of expertise as well as in general subjects. For many students this includes communicating in a second language.” (Intellectually Enlarging)2. Communicate effectively with diverse audiences using written, oral, visual, and digital media.

3. Perspective

“All instruction . . . should make their own contribution toward the balanced development of the total person [who] will not only be capable of meeting personal challenge and change but will also bring strength to others in the tasks of home and family life, social relationships, civic duty, and service to mankind. . . . all relationships within the BYU community should reflect devout love of God and a loving, genuine concern for the welfare of our neighbor.” “*Through the core education students will+ understand important ideas in their own cultural traditions as well as that of others.”

“Sound thinking… include[s] the ability to keep a proper perspective when comparing the things that matter most with things of lesser import.”

“The Lord has asked his children to ‘become acquainted with all good books, and with languages, tongues, and people (D&C 90:15)”

“A BYU education should reinforce such moral virtues as integrity, reverence, modesty, self-control, courage, compassion, and industry. . . . It aspires to develop in its students character traits that flow from the long-term application of gospel teachings in their lives. . . . Character is constructed by small decisions.”

3a. Describe important ideas in their own cultural traditions as well as in the traditions of others and from the various perspectives of the General Education disciplines.

3b. Evaluate global and local issues and their impact on the individual, family, community, society, and physical environment.

4. Faith and Spirituality

“All students at BYU should be taught the truths of the gospel of Jesus Christ.”

“The mission of BYU . . . is to assist individuals in their quest for perfection and eternal life. That assistance should provide a period of intensive learning in a stimulating setting where a commitment to excellence is expected and the full realization of human potential pursued.”

“The founding charge of BYU is to teach every subject with the Spirit… that every teacher in this institution would keep his subject matter bathed in the light and color of the restored gospel.’ … A shared desire to ‘seek learning, even by study and by faith.’ … A spiritually strengthening education warms and enlightens students by the bright fire of their teacher’s faith while enlarging their minds with knowledge.”

“A BYU education should bring together the intellectual integrity of fine academic discipline with the spiritual integrity of personal righteousness. The result is competence that reflects the highest professional and academic standards—strengthened and ennobled by Christlike attributes.”

4. Describe relationships among General Education core concepts and the restored gospel.

5. Sound Thinking and Problem Solving

“All instruction . . . should make their own contribution toward the balanced development of the total person [who] will not only be capable of meeting personal challenge and change but will also bring strength to others in the tasks of home and family life, social relationships, civic duty, and service to mankind. . . . all relationships within the BYU community should reflect devout love of God and a loving, genuine concern for the welfare of our neighbor.”

“[Students will] think clearly, communicate effectively, understand important ideas in their own cultural tradition as well as that of others, and establish clear standards of intellectual integrity.”

“Sound thinking—reasoning abilities that prepare students to understand and solve a wide variety of problems, both theoretical and practical. Such skills include… the ability to engage successfully in logical reasoning, critical analysis, moral discrimination, creative imagination, and independent thought.”

“Skills. BYU undergraduates should acquire the basic tools needed to learn. The essential academic learning skills are the abilities to think soundly, to communicate effectively, and to reason proficiently in quantitative terms.”

5a. Apply sound and original thinking to solve real-life problems.

5b. Collaborate effectively to solve problems and create ideas for the common good as a leader and as a participant.

5c. Examine and evaluate the strengths and weaknesses of their own ideas and arguments, as well as those of others, withholding judgment until they have gathered sufficient information and considered relevant implications.

6. Lifelong Learning

“The mission of BYU . . . is to assist individuals in their quest for perfection and eternal life. That assistance should provide a period of intensive learning in a stimulating setting where a commitment to excellence is expected and the full realization of human potential pursued. . . . [Students will] establish clear standards of intellectual integrity.”

“BYU should inspire students to keep alive their curiosity and prepare them to continue learning throughout their lives. BYU should produce careful readers, prayerful thinkers, and active participants in solving family, professional, religious, and social problems.”

6a. Continue learning throughout their lives.

6b. Actively apply their learning to contribute to the common good of society in solving family, professional, religious, and social problems.